Interview with Kalpa

Hi guys! How have you all been?
Hi, pleased to meet you. It’s been nice  and steady lately, perhaps a bit hectic at times. Normal stuff.

Last April you released your latest album ‘’Dissociation’’. How has the reception been so far?
“Dissociation” was well received from the underground. Some people did drift away because of the significant style shift to a more extreme sound, we guess, but the ones that stayed with us and those who came along the way really get our drift. We also organized and carried out a European Tour with our friends in Minerva Superduty to promote the album, during which the feedback we received was awesome. Lastly, speaking strictly in numbers, “Dissociation” is almost sold-out, so there’s that.

How did you decide to put vocals in your music?
It wasn’t much of a “decision” -let alone a deliberate one-. We really enjoy music both ways. At the time ‘Sequences’ was written we felt that there was not much vital space left for vocals. On ‘Dissociation’ we did find that ground to add an extra instrument, and the whole writing process was adjusted accordingly.

What inspires you the most?
Pretty much everything evolving around us. With music having a key role, inevitably, translating our perception of the world to sound.

Apart from your favorite bands what else would you name as a key influence?
I think each one’s social circle and everyday interactions are crucial. They shape each person slowly and steadily day by day. Art in every form is also a major influence for us. It’s just amazing to see how people can express themselves in so many different ways.

How is music produced in Kalpa?
We all contribute to each composition equally. The initial idea can only come from one single person; we then process it collectively, brainstorm on it and rehearse it till it reaches the point where we can visualize performing it live. Then, it’s not unusual for us to actually play it on stage to see if it passes the test or if we should make more adjustments to the song.

Given that your first album ‘’Sequences’’ was an instrumental one, how did you decide then to give your songs the song titles you did?
The “Sequences*” era seems somewhat far behind us, now. We really don’t remember a lot of specifics about the titles, just that at the time they felt good as a representation of the songs they were given to.

What does the name Kalpa represent?
A kalpa is, essentially, a Sanskrit word for a scale that times the creation, death and recreation of a world or universe. It is also a Finnish hockey team and a black metal solo artist from South Korea. There are probably more current updates on Wikipedia that we’re not aware of.

What are you listening to these days?
Tons of stuff where it reaches the point of being impossible to even start a list from the top of our heads. The amount of produced music -most of it being great, granted- is overwhelming. At this very moment, one of us probably headbangs to the new Succumb album and another one revisits Botch, while a third one absorbs old-school Hip-Hop. A couple of us also enjoyed the new album by the Afghan Whigs lately. The combinations are infinite.

You recently played two shows in Crete. How did it go there?
We had a great time in Crete and we’re really glad we’ve been given the chance (as individuals) to revisit the island, which we hadn’t done in years. We played Heraklion and Chania and people down there profoundly enjoy extreme music. Shout out to everyone who run the shows, those who came over and the bands we shared the stage with.

Do you have any live shows planned in the months to come?
At the moment we’re mainly focusing on writing the new album more than everything else, but we’re always available when it comes to being a part of and supporting initiatives that make sense to us, such as an upcoming DIY festival in Corfu in early June and Svenfest VII in Karditsa in late July, both of which we’ll be performing at.

What does the future hold for Kalpa?
A new album and as many gigs as we can possibly handle, both home and abroad.

10 essential death metal albums

Today i wanted to give you a list of ten essential death metal albums. There are obviously more than 100 essential death metal albums but these ten that comprise today’s list are also some of my favourite ones. So here goes. Albums go in no significant order.

Entombed – Left Hand Path

Morbid Angel – Blessed Are The Sick

Atheist – Unquestionable Presence

Autopsy – Severed Survival

At The Gates – The Red In The Sky Is Ours

Dismember – Like An Everflowing Stream

Bolt Thrower – War Master

Six Feet Under – Haunted

Darkthrone – Soulside Journey

Vader – The Ultimate Incantation

 

Half Gramme Of Soma – Groove is Black

VG1

Damn, there’s a huge eggplant floating in outer space. That’s the first thing i thought to myself when i came across Half Gramme of Soma’s upcoming, full length album. For those of you who don’t know let me just state that Half Gramme of Soma is a five piece, heavy space rock band from Athens, Greece. The band came into existence back in 2011. Their new album ”Groove Is Black” will be released this May through Fuzz ink Records. It was produced by the band and George Leodis and recorded back in November 2016 at Wreck-it Sound Studios, Corinth, Greece. Eight tracks will be included in this release. Well, this is what i’d personally call rock music straight from the heart. It’s the kind of music that will always be a good companion for you in both good and bad times. ”Groove Is Black” contains of course huge amounts of groove and i think that’s really cool. Expect to find heavy and yet atmospheric tracks. I myself liked all 8 of them but if i had to pick a favorite one that would have to be either ”Jerk” or ”No Man’s God”. The question is did i like this album? Well, i most certainly did. Therefore i would like to recommend it. Here’s a link where you can have a first taste of this album.

Meatwound – Largo

cover_1490711934973839

Meatwound is a four piece band from Tampa, Florida. Their new album ”Largo” will be released on May 12 through Magic Bullet Records. I’ve been listening to this album for some time now and the thing is i liked it a lot. So today i thought it would be a good idea to say some things about Meatwound’s upcoming, new album. Seven tracks are included in this release. The first two tracks of this album are trully awesome. I’m talking about ”Seance” and ”Pigs”. When ”Pigs” came to an end i was like ”O.k gentlemen you now have my full attention”. I mean this 90’s mathcore of theirs is more than welcome. I sure as hell liked their vocals and their concrete basslines. And i can tell you for sure that the rest of this album’s tracks didn’t let me down at all. I didn’t feel at all like wanting to skip a song or anything like that and that’s because there’s a really nice flow within this album. In my opinion these guys have put together an excellent album. Fans of Botch, Coalesce, Breach, Burnt By The Sun dig in.

Interview with Daniel Pilsäter from No Omega

Hi there! First of all congratulations on your new album! On what degree does it follow on from its predecessor?
Hi, thanks! It’s a fun record for me, because there’s a lot of new stuff going on. We have a new drummer since the last record, and even though we step off in some familiar ground on some songs, we’ve tried things that I’ve wanted to do for a while! There are still themes that we’ve touched upon before, but I think Oscar (vocals) is writing a much more personal record this time.

Can you tell us about your main influences?
Musically, I think we all come from listening to screamo, and moody rock music. Swedish screamo like Suis la lune and Italian bands like Raein and La Quiete, or American bands like Loma Prieta or Ampere. Earlier on I’d say Converge, Killing the Dream, Meleeh and maybe post-metal stuff played a bigger part for us.

Where do you draw inspiration from?
We’ve pulled a lot of lyrical themes from the Ishmael book series. I’d say there’s a feeling that comes from a more diffuse place though, the frustration and hopelessness that the world puts on your shoulders. Like you know something’s wrong, with everything, and there’s nothing we can do.

How is music produced in No Omega?
It almost always comes from someone who wrote some guitar parts at home, brings it to the band where we hash out a structure and maybe find new ways to play the chords together. It used to be Oscar and Andreas (old singer), and then I started writing some songs, and now we have a pretty good system on how to get a core for a song going. Gabriel who joined on drums 2015 has really pushed our writing, in my opinion. Joakim who plays bass never brings his own songs from scratch, but he has a lot of good ideas, and always wants to try and find new ways of playing a song.

Your new album ‘’Culture’’ comes out on May. How did the recording sessions go?
I thought they were good. We spent two weekends up in Söderhamn with our friend Dennis, just recording and hanging out with the Söderhamn crew. We finished up the vocals in Stockholm, but I really appreciate the chance to leave Stockholm when we record this band. I need to focus, and have an outsider kind of push us through the sessions.

Is there a concept behind this album you’d like to talk about?
Hmm. If there is a concept, I’d say it’s communication. That’s the new thing in the lyrics, and it ties a lot of the songs together. We keep talking about how important communication is, both between ourselves, but also from band to audience, and how hard it can be. When making music, it’s important to me that what I think also comes through to the listener, and sometimes it feels useless even trying. And then when it works, and you connect, it’s amazing.

What are you listening to these days?
I got heavily into the artist Mitski this winter, and her new record Puberty 2. It’s SO GOOD. Other than that, I listen to a lot of americana/folky stuff, and for aggressive music it’s either death metal, hardcore stuff like Protester or more screamo. And the usual, Radiohead, Kent etc.

Which is your favorite way of enjoying music? What would you choose between digital and physical format?
I like collecting music physically, because of the packaging, and you get another relationship to the record. But I rarely sit down and listen to my records anymore, and I have even started paying for Spotify. I used to just get my music digitally and put it on an iPod or something. Now I have playlists of stuff I’m into, like full albums, but I have to admit I sometimes listen to normal playlists too…

Do you have any live shows planned for this year?
We’re doing a release tour for Culture in April, which will be our first tour booked by Loudnoise. We’ll be playing mainland Europe, and this summer we’re coming back with our Japanese friends Endzweck to play festivals.
We have some more things lined up, but we’ll see what comes through! We might even play a hometown show this year.

What does the future hold for No Omega?
No idea. We’ve been a band for a long time now. We’ll see.

Hexis – Tando Ashanti

hexis front.jpg
Hexis is a band from Copenhagen, Denmark that came into existence back in 2010.  ”Tando Ashanti” ,which will be released on the 14th of April, is their new album. Eleven tracks are included in this release. The band’s music combines black metal, doom metal and hardcore. They have actually taken the best out of these three genres. That’s what listening to this album feels like. ”Tando Ashanti” sounds extremely heavy and brutal. It is an album that’s pitch dark and cold as life itself. I mean these black metal riffs of theirs gave me the chills. This is an album that you need to listen to from the begininng till the end. Yes, ”Tando Ashanti” is an album that you need to experience. There’s no other way. Feel this hellish attack that’s coming out of your speakers and embrace its overwhelming might. Make sure you turn up the volume before you start listening to this album. Also wait till it gets a bit dark. These two steps are essential in order to maximize the experience. I personally loved all of this album’s tracks. Don’t make any random pickings. Just press play and let this album speak for itself, for it is a great album. From us it is a 9 out of 10.